Willoughby's Return : A Tale of Almost Irresistible Temptation

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  • Additional Information
    • Publication Type:
      eBook.
    • Abstract:
      A lost love returns, rekindling forgotten passions…In Jane Austen's Sense and Sensibility, when Marianne Dashwood marries Colonel Brandon, she puts her heartbreak over dashing scoundrel John Willoughby in the past. Three years later, Willoughby's return throws Marianne into a tizzy of painful memories and exquisite feelings of uncertainty. Willoughby is as charming, as roguish, and as much in love with her as ever. And the timing couldn't be worse—with Colonel Brandon away and Willoughby determined to win her back, will Marianne find the strength to save her marriage, or will the temptation of a previous love be too powerful to resist?Praise for Lydia Bennet's Story:'A breathtaking Regency romp!'— Diana Birchall, author of Mrs. Darcy's Dilemma'An absolute delight to read.'— Historical Novels Review'Odiwe emulates Austen's famous wit, and manages to give Lydia a happily-ever-after ending worthy of any Regency romance heroine.'— Booklist'Odiwe pays nice homage to Austen's stylings and endears the reader to the formerly secondary character, spoiled and impulsive Lydia Bennet.'— Publisher's Weekly'Rollicking good fun with a surprise twist.'— Austenprose
    • Subject Terms:
    • Subject Terms:
    • Related ISBNs:
      9781402222672. 9781402228285. 9781402222665. 9781402228292.
    • Accession Number:
      649846632
    • Accession Number:
      324278
    • Publication Information:
      Print/Save 60 pages
      Copy/Paste Allowed
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      ODIWE, J.; AUSTEN, J. Willoughby’s Return : A Tale of Almost Irresistible Temptation. Naperville, Ill: Sourcebooks Landmark, 2009. ISBN 9781402222672. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=324278&custid=s6224580. Acesso em: 23 jan. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Odiwe J, Austen J. Willoughby’s Return : A Tale of Almost Irresistible Temptation. Naperville, Ill: Sourcebooks Landmark; 2009. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=324278&custid=s6224580. Accessed January 23, 2020.
    • APA:
      Odiwe, J., & Austen, J. (2009). Willoughby’s Return : A Tale of Almost Irresistible Temptation. Naperville, Ill: Sourcebooks Landmark. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=324278&custid=s6224580
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Odiwe, Jane, and Jane Austen. 2009. Willoughby’s Return : A Tale of Almost Irresistible Temptation. Naperville, Ill: Sourcebooks Landmark. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=324278&custid=s6224580.
    • Harvard:
      Odiwe, J. and Austen, J. (2009) Willoughby’s Return : A Tale of Almost Irresistible Temptation. Naperville, Ill: Sourcebooks Landmark. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=324278&custid=s6224580 (Accessed: 23 January 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Odiwe, J & Austen, J 2009, Willoughby’s Return : A Tale of Almost Irresistible Temptation, Sourcebooks Landmark, Naperville, Ill, viewed 23 January 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Odiwe, Jane, and Jane Austen. Willoughby’s Return : A Tale of Almost Irresistible Temptation. Sourcebooks Landmark, 2009. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=324278&custid=s6224580.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Odiwe, Jane, and Jane Austen. Willoughby’s Return : A Tale of Almost Irresistible Temptation. Naperville, Ill: Sourcebooks Landmark, 2009. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=324278&custid=s6224580.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Odiwe J, Austen J. Willoughby’s Return : A Tale of Almost Irresistible Temptation [Internet]. Naperville, Ill: Sourcebooks Landmark; 2009 [cited 2020 Jan 23]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=nlebk&AN=324278&custid=s6224580

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2009 November #2

Odiwe follows Lydia Bennet's Story (2008), her sequel to Pride and Prejudice, with a sequel to Austen's Sense and Sensibility. Marianne has settled nicely into life as wife and mother, although every so often she indulges in one of her infamous flights of sensibility. She is certain her husband, William, adores her, but has he gotten over his passion for his first love, whose portrait occupies a place of honor in their home? The arrival of William's nephew Henry grants Marianne the opportunity to play matchmaker between Henry and her sister Margaret, but the return of John Willoughby to Dorsetshire is not welcome news because now Marianne faces the difficult decision of whether to remain true to the quietly dependable man who married her, or give in to temptation with the rogue who broke her heart. Odiwe's elegantly stylish writing is seasoned with just the right dash of tart humor, and her latest literary endeavor is certain to delight both Austen devotees and Regency romance readers. Copyright 2009 Booklist Reviews.

PW Reviews 2009 September #3

Odiwe's sequel to Sense and Sensibility is best at recalling Austen's descriptive abilities, but falls short in its treatment of Austen's beloved characters. Three years after Marianne and Col. William Brandon get married, they're still unable to discuss two critical and intertwined issues: namely, that Marianne feels jealous of William's ward, Eliza, the illegitimate daughter of his first love; and the reappearance of Eliza's father, John Willoughby, who was once Marianne's love. Matters are complicated by the growing affection between Marianne's sister, Margaret, and William's nephew Henry, a developing relationship that serves as a stand-in for the original book's. As their unshared feelings fester, distance grows between Marianne and William; Odiwe nods occasionally to the inequality between marriage partners, which allows the man to carry on much as he did prior to marriage, an issue that Austen herself would likely tackle; unfortunately, it's hard to maintain suspense when the central plot conflict can be cleared up with a five-minute conversation. (Nov.)

[Page 38]. Copyright 2009 Reed Business Information.