The Washington Decree.

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  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      ROMO, K. L. The Washington Decree. Library Journal, [s. l.], v. 143, n. 11, p. 64–71, 2018. Disponível em: . Acesso em: 16 nov. 2019.
    • AMA:
      Romo KL. The Washington Decree. Library Journal. 2018;143(11):64-71. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=lfh&AN=129963597&custid=s6224580. Accessed November 16, 2019.
    • APA:
      Romo, K. L. (2018). The Washington Decree. Library Journal, 143(11), 64–71. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=lfh&AN=129963597&custid=s6224580
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Romo, K. L. 2018. “The Washington Decree.” Library Journal 143 (11): 64–71. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=lfh&AN=129963597&custid=s6224580.
    • Harvard:
      Romo, K. L. (2018) ‘The Washington Decree’, Library Journal, 143(11), pp. 64–71. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=lfh&AN=129963597&custid=s6224580 (Accessed: 16 November 2019).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Romo, KL 2018, ‘The Washington Decree’, Library Journal, vol. 143, no. 11, pp. 64–71, viewed 16 November 2019, .
    • MLA:
      Romo, K. L. “The Washington Decree.” Library Journal, vol. 143, no. 11, June 2018, pp. 64–71. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=lfh&AN=129963597&custid=s6224580.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Romo, K. L. “The Washington Decree.” Library Journal 143, no. 11 (June 15, 2018): 64–71. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=lfh&AN=129963597&custid=s6224580.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Romo KL. The Washington Decree. Library Journal [Internet]. 2018 Jun 15 [cited 2019 Nov 16];143(11):64–71. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=lfh&AN=129963597&custid=s6224580

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2018 June #1

Berry's debut, Under the Harrow (2016), won an Edgar for Best First Novel and garnered multiple "best books" listings, making it a hard act to follow. Critics praised Berry's striking, original voice and Hitchcockian twists, both in evidence again here, along with the themes of obsession and memory. The major difference between the two books is that rather than an abrupt and surprising ending, A Double Life features a somewhat protracted and shocking conclusion that will have nail-biters gnawing down to their nubs. Claire is a dedicated doctor living an insular life in London under an assumed name because she is the daughter of a notorious murder suspect. Nearly 30 years earlier, while Claire and her brother slept, their father was assumed to have killed their nanny and brutally assaulted their mother, then disappeared without a trace. She believes that his powerful and privileged friends are protecting him and goes to extraordinary lengths to ingratiate herself with them, recklessly blackmailing them for his current location. Bound to please Berry's fans as well as followers of domestic-noir masters of the be-careful-what-you-wish-for tale, including Hallie Ephron, Gillian Flynn, and Paula Hawkins. Copyright 2018 Booklist Reviews.

LJ Reviews 2018 June #2

Claire Alden is a young doctor in London, obsessed with the disappearance of her father. The first lord to be accused of murder in nearly a century, he vanished when she was a child; her nanny also disappeared at the same time. Claire's father left no trace except the bloodstains in his car, which was abandoned near the sea. Claire's mother claims her husband was home when the murder occurred, but his titled cronies say no. Is he innocent or is Claire the daughter of a brutal murderer? She is consumed by her need for the truth, but how far will she go, and how much of her life will she sacrifice to find it? Calm and deliberate in its unfolding, the story steadily gains momentum to the snap of the very last page. VERDICT Loosely based on the infamous 1974 Lord Lucan case, in which a British lord suspected in the murder of his family's nanny disappeared, this second novel from Edgar Award-winning Berry (Under the Harrow) presents a polished psychological thriller that will be devoured by fans of Ruth Ware, Gillian Flynn, and Paula Hawkins.—Susan Clifford Braun, Bainbridge Island, WA

Copyright 2018 Library Journal.

PW Reviews 2018 April #3

London doctor Claire Alden, the 34-year-old narrator of this engrossing psychological thriller from Edgar-winner Berry (Under the Harrow), remains obsessed with finding answers decades after the horrific night when her nanny was slaughtered in her family's Belgravia townhouse and her mother, Faye, was left near death. The crime's prime suspect, Claire's titled father, Colin Spenser, vanished without a trace. Claire, who leads an almost hermitlike existence, can't stop her sleuthing. She tails some of her father's posh friends in a desperate hunt for clues to his whereabouts as well as why they hated her working-class mother so much that they would shield a murderer. Claire combs through her own memories and Faye's extensive diary entries and other research to vividly imagine her parents' relationship, then subsequently manages to befriend, unrecognized, the daughter of one of Colin's closest chums in the hope of discovering further leads. The action builds to a shocking but satisfying conclusion. Berry tells this shattering story with surprising grace. Agent: Emily Forland, Brandt & Hochman Literary Agents. (July)

Copyright 2018 Publishers Weekly.