Inventing a Saint: Religious Fiction in Post-Communist Russia.

Item request has been placed! ×
Item request cannot be made. ×
loading   Processing Request
  • Additional Information
    • Subject Terms:
    • Subject Terms:
    • Subject Terms:
    • Abstract:
      This article deals with the narrative of a Russian Orthodox priest, Father Arseny—a Soviet era martyr in the eyes of his adherents—whose memories are said to be collected by some of his followers. However, the origins of the story (first published in the 1990s) remain controversial. Russian Orthodox supporters, in conjunction with the translator of Father Arseny's hagiography, have been at the forefront to give credibility to the memory of Father Arseny. At the same time, critical voices have constantly disputed the biographical reality of the saint and the fictional character of his book. Remarkably, some who deny the reality of Father Arseny value the narrative for its spiritual quality. In this article, we describe the processes of authentication that are at work in this case. We show that the different truth claims which are at stake here point to different ideas of what true religion is and what it should offer people. [ABSTRACT FROM PUBLISHER]
    • Abstract:
      Copyright of Journal of the American Academy of Religion is the property of Oxford University Press / USA and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)