Evolving Attitudes Towards Thaumaturgy in the Works of Lloyd C. Douglas.

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    • Abstract:
      Miracles are treated variously in the fictional and non-fictional works of the prominent American novelist, clergyman, and religious writer Lloyd C. Douglas (1877-1951). During the 'modernist-fundamentalist' strife of the 1920s, he published his Those Disturbing Miracles (1927), in which he propounded an amalgam of nineteenth-century rationalist and twentieth-century psychological explanations of biblical miracles. This anti-supernaturalist approach characterised his fictional works of the 1930s. Douglas's immensely popular novel of 1942, The Robe, however, is a transitional work in which miraculous elements are acknowledged. In his final novel, The Big Fisherman (1948), he evinced a nearly unqualified acceptance of miracles of the New Testament and indeed created some additional ones to enhance his narrative. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
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