We Run This City: Impact of a Community-School Fitness Program on Obesity, Health, and Fitness.

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  • Additional Information
    • Affiliation:
      Prevention Research Center for Healthy Neighborhoods and Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio
      Department of Nutrition, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio
      Prevention Research Center for Healthy Neighborhoods, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio
      YMCA of Greater Cleveland, Cleveland, Ohio
    • Subject Terms:
    • Subject Terms:
    • Abstract:
      Introduction: The We Run This City (WRTC) Youth Marathon Program is a community-supported, school-based fitness program designed to increase physical activity in a large, urban school district by engaging middle school youth to train 12 to 14 weeks to run or walk 1.2 miles, 6.2 miles, or 13.1 miles of the Rite Aid Cleveland Marathon. The objective of our study was to evaluate the effect of the intervention on adolescent health.Methods: We assessed changes in obesity, health, and fitness, measured before training and postintervention, among 1,419 sixth- to eighth-grade students participating in WRTC for the first time, with particular interest in the program's effect on overweight (85th-94th body mass index percentile) or obese (≥95th percentile) students. We collected data from 2009 through 2012, and analyzed it in 2016 and 2017. Outcomes of interest were body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), elevated blood pressure, and fitness levels evaluated by using the Progressive Aerobic Cardiovascular Endurance Run (PACER) test and the sit-to-stand test.Results: We saw significant improvements overall in fitness and blood pressure. Controlling for demographics, program event, and training dosage, BMI percentile increased among normal weight participants and decreased among overweight and obese participants (P < .001). WHR increased among obese participants, whereas reductions in blood pressure among those with elevated blood pressure were associated with higher amounts of training and lower baseline BMI.Conclusion: Even small amounts of regular physical activity can affect the health and fitness of urban youths. School-community partnerships offer a promising approach to increasing physical activity by supporting schools and making a school-based activity inclusive, fun, and connected to the broader fitness community.
    • Journal Subset:
      Blind Peer Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Health Promotion/Education; Peer Reviewed; Public Health; USA
    • Instrumentation:
      Impact of Events Scale (IES)
    • ISSN:
      1545-1151
    • MEDLINE Info:
      PMID: 29729132 NLM UID: 101205018
    • Grant Information:
      U58 DP524470/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States; U48DP005030//ACL HHS/United States; R01 DP000107/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
    • Publication Date:
      In Process
    • Publication Date:
      20191011
    • Accession Number:
      http://dx.doi.org/10.5888/pcd15.160471
    • Accession Number:
      129423967
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      BORAWSKI, E. A. et al. We Run This City: Impact of a Community-School Fitness Program on Obesity, Health, and Fitness. Preventing Chronic Disease, [s. l.], v. 15, p. 1–12, 2018. Disponível em: . Acesso em: 21 nov. 2019.
    • AMA:
      Borawski EA, Drewes Jones S, Danosky Yoder L, et al. We Run This City: Impact of a Community-School Fitness Program on Obesity, Health, and Fitness. Preventing Chronic Disease. 2018;15:1-12. doi:10.5888/pcd15.160471.
    • APA:
      Borawski, E. A., Drewes Jones, S., Danosky Yoder, L., Taylor, T., Clint, B. A., Goodwin, M. A., … Yoder, L. D. (2018). We Run This City: Impact of a Community-School Fitness Program on Obesity, Health, and Fitness. Preventing Chronic Disease, 15, 1–12. https://doi.org/10.5888/pcd15.160471
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Borawski, Elaine A., Sarah Drewes Jones, Laura Danosky Yoder, Tara Taylor, Barbara A. Clint, Meredith A. Goodwin, Erika S. Trapl, Sarah Drewes Jones, and Laura Danosky Yoder. 2018. “We Run This City: Impact of a Community-School Fitness Program on Obesity, Health, and Fitness.” Preventing Chronic Disease 15 (May): 1–12. doi:10.5888/pcd15.160471.
    • Harvard:
      Borawski, E. A. et al. (2018) ‘We Run This City: Impact of a Community-School Fitness Program on Obesity, Health, and Fitness’, Preventing Chronic Disease, 15, pp. 1–12. doi: 10.5888/pcd15.160471.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Borawski, EA, Drewes Jones, S, Danosky Yoder, L, Taylor, T, Clint, BA, Goodwin, MA, Trapl, ES, Jones, SD & Yoder, LD 2018, ‘We Run This City: Impact of a Community-School Fitness Program on Obesity, Health, and Fitness’, Preventing Chronic Disease, vol. 15, pp. 1–12, viewed 21 November 2019, .
    • MLA:
      Borawski, Elaine A., et al. “We Run This City: Impact of a Community-School Fitness Program on Obesity, Health, and Fitness.” Preventing Chronic Disease, vol. 15, May 2018, pp. 1–12. EBSCOhost, doi:10.5888/pcd15.160471.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Borawski, Elaine A., Sarah Drewes Jones, Laura Danosky Yoder, Tara Taylor, Barbara A. Clint, Meredith A. Goodwin, Erika S. Trapl, Sarah Drewes Jones, and Laura Danosky Yoder. “We Run This City: Impact of a Community-School Fitness Program on Obesity, Health, and Fitness.” Preventing Chronic Disease 15 (May 3, 2018): 1–12. doi:10.5888/pcd15.160471.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Borawski EA, Drewes Jones S, Danosky Yoder L, Taylor T, Clint BA, Goodwin MA, et al. We Run This City: Impact of a Community-School Fitness Program on Obesity, Health, and Fitness. Preventing Chronic Disease [Internet]. 2018 May 3 [cited 2019 Nov 21];15:1–12. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=ccm&AN=129423967&custid=s6224580