Six months in 1945 : FDR, Stalin, Churchill and Truman--from world war to cold war / by Michael Dobbs.

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  • Additional Information
    • Publication Information:
      1st ed.
    • Abstract:
      Summary: A riveting account of the pivotal six-month period spanning the end of World War II, the dawn of the nuclear age, and the beginning of the Cold War.
    • Content Notes:
      "The best I could do". Roosevelt : February 3 ; Stalin : February 4 ; Churchill : February 5 ; Poland : February 6 ; Grand Design : February 10 ; Euphoria : February 13 -- "An Iron Curtain is drawn down". Comrade Vyshinsky : February 27 ; "An impenetrable veil" : March 7 ; Death of a President : April 12 ; The neophyte and the Commissar : April 23 ; Linkup : April 25 ; Victory : May 8 ; "The salvation of the world" : May 26 ; Atomic poker : June 1 ; Red Empire : June 24 -- "A peace that is no peace". Berlin : July 4 ; Terminal : July 16 ; Loot : July 23 ; "FINIS" : July 26 ; Hiroshima : August 6 ; After the bomb.
    • Notes:
      HIST.
      FUND: 110001-474001-71404-40006 (14-BKMAIN17)
      Includes bibliographical references (p. [395]-402) and index.
    • ISBN:
      9780307271655
      030727165X
    • Accession Number:
      2012021747
    • Accession Number:
      ocn769425335
      769425335
    • Accession Number:
      lcc.ocn769425335
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      DOBBS, M. Six months in 1945 : FDR, Stalin, Churchill and Truman--from world war to cold war. [s. l.]: Alfred A. Knopf, 2012. ISBN 9780307271655. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05560a&AN=lcc.ocn769425335&custid=s6224580. Acesso em: 5 dez. 2019.
    • AMA:
      Dobbs M. Six Months in 1945 : FDR, Stalin, Churchill and Truman--from World War to Cold War. Alfred A. Knopf; 2012. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05560a&AN=lcc.ocn769425335&custid=s6224580. Accessed December 5, 2019.
    • APA:
      Dobbs, M. (2012). Six months in 1945 : FDR, Stalin, Churchill and Truman--from world war to cold war. Alfred A. Knopf. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05560a&AN=lcc.ocn769425335&custid=s6224580
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Dobbs, Michael. 2012. Six Months in 1945 : FDR, Stalin, Churchill and Truman--from World War to Cold War. Alfred A. Knopf. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05560a&AN=lcc.ocn769425335&custid=s6224580.
    • Harvard:
      Dobbs, M. (2012) Six months in 1945 : FDR, Stalin, Churchill and Truman--from world war to cold war. Alfred A. Knopf. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05560a&AN=lcc.ocn769425335&custid=s6224580 (Accessed: 5 December 2019).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Dobbs, M 2012, Six months in 1945 : FDR, Stalin, Churchill and Truman--from world war to cold war, Alfred A. Knopf, viewed 5 December 2019, .
    • MLA:
      Dobbs, Michael. Six Months in 1945 : FDR, Stalin, Churchill and Truman--from World War to Cold War. Alfred A. Knopf, 2012. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05560a&AN=lcc.ocn769425335&custid=s6224580.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Dobbs, Michael. Six Months in 1945 : FDR, Stalin, Churchill and Truman--from World War to Cold War. Alfred A. Knopf, 2012. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05560a&AN=lcc.ocn769425335&custid=s6224580.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Dobbs M. Six months in 1945 : FDR, Stalin, Churchill and Truman--from world war to cold war [Internet]. Alfred A. Knopf; 2012 [cited 2019 Dec 5]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05560a&AN=lcc.ocn769425335&custid=s6224580

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2012 September #1

The author of several popular titles about the Cold War, Dobbs opens this book where the conflict began, in the Allies' acrimony over interpreting their agreements made at the end of WWII. Favoring a journalistic style that embeds the issues, such as Poland and German reparations, in atmospheric descriptions of the Yalta and Potsdam conferences' interior decor and meal menus, Dobbs lends the subject an immediacy that will engage history readers, who will be within earshot of leaders and their aides as they meet, adjourn, dine, and wrangle over the affairs of defeated Germany and its former empire. Stalin's negotiating advantages become evident in Dobbs' narrative, as does mounting British and American alarm about the Russians' failure, in their view, to fulfill their pledges. Dobbs does not limit the Western allies' growing irritation to the attitudes of Truman and Churchill; he adds those of officers in East Germany, Romania, and elsewhere, who witnessed Soviet methods of imposing Communist control. Concluding with the Potsdam conference's impasses, Dobbs delivers a readily accessible presentation of the onset of the Cold War. Copyright 2012 Booklist Reviews.

LJ Reviews 2012 May #1

In February 1945, when Roosevelt, Churchill, and Stalin met in Yalta, the start of the Cold War lay only months away. Dobbs, a former Washington Post reporter who covered the fall of communism and authored the best-selling One Minute to Midnight, about 1960s nuclear brinkmanship, should have the perspective to cover this story. Lots of in-house enthusiasm.

[Page 54]. (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

LJ Reviews 2012 October #2

Dobbs persuasively locates the beginning of the Cold War in the period roughly between the Yalta Conference of February 1945 and the Potsdam Conference in July, when the victorious Allies met up against the intractable problems of reconciling their divergent interests and war aims. The later confrontations of the Cold War, he says, were adumbrated by early tests of will that took place even before the end of war. The end of the war in Europe, and the prospect of an atomic bomb, accelerated the wartime Allies' desire to consolidate and improve their respective positions before Japan surrendered. Using many primary sources, Dobbs sketches vivid portraits of the leaders who shaped events, or neglected to do so, and ably conveys the tension and uncertainty of the era. VERDICT Recommended for serious and lay military historians, and all readers seeking an understanding of the origins of the Cold War.—RF

[Page 88]. (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

LJ Reviews Newsletter

Dobbs persuasively locates the beginning of the Cold War in the period roughly between the Yalta Conference of February 1945 and the Potsdam Conference in July, when the victorious Allies met up against the intractable problems of reconciling their divergent interests and war aims. The later confrontations of the Cold War, he says, were adumbrated by early tests of will that took place even before the end of war. The end of the war in Europe, and the prospect of an atomic bomb, accelerated the wartime Allies' desire to consolidate and improve their respective positions before Japan surrendered. Using many primary sources, Dobbs sketches vivid portraits of the leaders who shaped events, or neglected to do so, and ably conveys the tension and uncertainty of the era. VERDICT Recommended for serious and lay military historians, and all readers seeking an understanding of the origins of the Cold War.—RF (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

PW Reviews 2012 July #4

According to popular mythology, from February to August 1945 allied armies rolled to victory in WWII, but then ineffectual Western leaders caved in to Stalin, resulting in the cold war. Veteran journalist Dobbs (One Minute to Midnight) takes a more nuanced view and asserts that neither Russian nor Western leaders understood one another's inner workings. In mapping a course for Europe, both Roosevelt, at Yalta in February 1945, and Truman, at Potsdam in July of that year, failed to sway Stalin from his desire to impose a Soviet sphere of influence on Eastern Europe. Critics labeled this a betrayal of democratic ideals, but the Red Army was on the spot, and no one supported a war to eject them. Skeptical of the great man theory of history, Dobbs thinks that the cold war was probably inevitable, and merely delayed by the presence of a mutual enemy. He says also that Stalin was not, like Hitler, purely autocratic, and operated within the Soviet Union's own systemic constraints. His goal was to prepare for a new war with the West within the next 20 years, but Eastern Europe proved a persistent drain and the U.S.S.R.'s clunky command economy could not hope to satisfy its citizens. Dobbs offers an astute narrative of the six months that changed the world. 8 maps. Agent: Raphael Sagalyn, Sagalyn Literary. (Oct.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2012 PWxyz LLC