Esau / Philip Kerr.

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  • Additional Information
    • Publication Information:
      1st trade ed.
    • Abstract:
      Summary: An expedition is mounted to the Himalayas to capture the Abominable Snowman, believed to be the missing link between ape and man. It follows a mountain climber's discovery of the skull of a recently dead snowman, which scientists claim proves the species actually exists. An adventure story that looks at evolution. By the author of The Grid.
    • Notes:
      "A Marian Wood book."
      1
      ADVENTURE
    • ISBN:
      0805051759 (alk. paper)
    • Accession Number:
      96044310
    • Accession Number:
      lcc.88548
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      KERR, P. Esau. [s. l.]: Henry Holt and Co., 1997. ISBN 0805051759. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05560a&AN=lcc.88548&custid=s6224580. Acesso em: 20 jan. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Kerr P. Esau. Henry Holt and Co.; 1997. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05560a&AN=lcc.88548&custid=s6224580. Accessed January 20, 2020.
    • APA:
      Kerr, P. (1997). Esau. Henry Holt and Co. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05560a&AN=lcc.88548&custid=s6224580
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Kerr, Philip. 1997. Esau. Henry Holt and Co. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05560a&AN=lcc.88548&custid=s6224580.
    • Harvard:
      Kerr, P. (1997) Esau. Henry Holt and Co. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05560a&AN=lcc.88548&custid=s6224580 (Accessed: 20 January 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Kerr, P 1997, Esau, Henry Holt and Co., viewed 20 January 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Kerr, Philip. Esau. Henry Holt and Co., 1997. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05560a&AN=lcc.88548&custid=s6224580.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Kerr, Philip. Esau. Henry Holt and Co., 1997. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05560a&AN=lcc.88548&custid=s6224580.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Kerr P. Esau [Internet]. Henry Holt and Co.; 1997 [cited 2020 Jan 20]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05560a&AN=lcc.88548&custid=s6224580

Reviews

Booklist Monthly Selections - #2 February 1997

A thriller that satisfies the mind nearly as much as it satisfies the desire for plot. Jack, a renowned mountain climber, is caught in a Himalayan avalanche, only to wake up in a cave facing a fossilized skull. Luckily for him, he gets off the mountain, and luckier still, his sometime girlfriend, Stella, is a Berkley paleoanthropologist. Stella discovers that the skull still isn't a fossil, it's an actual skull of a hominid much like man. Yet carbon dating reveals that the skull isn't from millenniums ago, it may be less than a thousand years old. Stella and Jack decide it's the skull of a Yeti--the Abominable Snowman of the Himalayas, a new species and perhaps the genetic link to our past. Together, they organize an expedition to find these people, and Esau is off and running. Setting his story against developing tensions between India and Pakistan that are about to result in nuclear confrontation and using well the thriller conventions, Kerr ask serious questions about science and humanity's past and future. Stylish and well paced, with great characterization and a wealth of fascinating techno details, this is genre fiction at its best. Kerr, one of Granta's 20 best young British novelists, delivers a novel that defines the "good read," while leaving the reader feeling a bit smarter the next morning. This should be Kerr's big hit. ((Reviewed February 15, 1997)) Copyright 2000 Booklist Reviews

LJ Reviews 1997 January

In what may be yet another new genre category, the anthropological thriller (remember John Darnton's Neanderthal and Petru Popescu's Almost Adam?), a fossil suggesting an alternative hominid development is found in the Himalayas even as war threatens the Indian subcontinent. The folks at Holt think that Britisher Kerr has been undersold here and are pushing him with a 200,000-copy first printing. Copyright 1998 Library Journal Reviews

LJ Reviews 1997 February

During a climb on a Himalayan mountain, "rock jock" Jack Furness is propelled by an avalanche into a cave, where he finds a skull. His paleoanthropologist friend, Swift, soon determines that the skull belongs to neither man nor ape. Thus begins this riveting, well-written tale about a search for a new species. Like Michael Crichton, Kerr (The Grid, LJ 3/15/96) seamlessly incorporates cutting-edge science into his fiction, with fascinating results. Unlike Crichton, however, he doesn't rely on gimmicky plots and hollow characters. Esau is not without its faults: readers may have trouble keeping track of the many characters, and the ending has a New Age tint that clashes with the rest of the book. Still, this is an extraordinary, sophisticated thriller, and most libraries should have a copy. Mark Annichiarico, "Library Journal" Copyright 1998 Library Journal Reviews

PW Reviews 1997 March #1

British author Kerr follows The Grid with an accomplished hybrid of science and Spielberg, in which readers journey to a pristine, mystical locale high in the Himalayas. Jack Furness, America's greatest mountain climber, is the only survivor of an ill-fated and illegal assault on Machhapuchhare, a huge peak considered holy by the Nepalese. He returns to the U.S. and presents his former lover, paleoanthropologist Stella Swift, with a hominoid skull he found in an ice cave on the mountain. The skull turns out to be not a fossil but the remains of a more popularly known as an Abominable Snowman. Stella and Jack quickly assemble an expedition whose nominal purpose is fossil-finding on a neighboring mountain, but whose real purpose is to trap a yeti in order to advance both science and their own glory. What they don't know is that the Pentagon has an interest in this region as well, and has inserted a secret agent into the expedition. The daredevil feats of the mountaineers, the impossible cold and the endless miles of glacier and snow in the little-visited Annapurna Sanctuary make this novel a marvelous armchair travelogue, but it's far more: a complicated yet visceral thriller in which monsters, human and otherwise, roam the earth and hunt each other. Convincing scientific and technological detail will have readers believing easily in yetis and other wonders of the world's highest mountains; they will even forgive the unabashed sentimentality of the ending. Kerr manages his large cast of characters with a sure hand, while the plot gathers speed and power like a Himalayan avalanche. Rights (except electronic): A.P. Watt. (May) Copyright 1998 Publishers Weekly Reviews

PW Reviews 1998 March #1

British author Kerr follows The Grid with an accomplished hybrid of science and Spielberg, in which readers journey to a pristine, mystical locale high in the Himalayas. Jack Furness, America's greatest mountain climber, is the only survivor of an ill-fated?and illegal?assault on Machhapuchhare, a huge peak considered holy by the Nepalese. He returns to the U.S. and presents his former lover, paleoanthropologist Stella Swift, with a hominoid skull he found in an ice cave on the mountain. The skull turns out to be not a fossil but the remains of a yeti?more popularly known as an Abominable Snowman. Stella and Jack quickly assemble an expedition whose nominal purpose is fossil-finding on a neighboring mountain, but whose real purpose is to trap a yeti in order to advance both science and their own glory. What they don't know is that the Pentagon has an interest in this region as well, and has inserted a secret agent into the expedition. The daredevil feats of the mountaineers, the impossible cold and the endless miles of glacier and snow in the little-visited Annapurna Sanctuary make this novel a marvelous armchair travelogue, but it's far more: a complicated yet visceral thriller in which monsters, human and otherwise, roam the earth and hunt each other. Convincing scientific and technological detail will have readers believing easily in yetis and other wonders of the world's highest mountains; they will even forgive the unabashed sentimentality of the ending. Kerr manages his large cast of characters with a sure hand, while the plot gathers speed and power like a Himalayan avalanche. Rights (except electronic): A.P. Watt. (May)