SEX AND RACE DIFFERENCES IN NONACADEMIC WAGES ON UNIVERSITY CAMPUS.

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    • Abstract:
      This study tests the hypothesis that, when other variables are taken into account, race and sex are not statistically significant in explaining wages in different occupations. The results, using data for the nonacademic work force of a large university campus, do not support the hypothesis. On the contrary, they show that sex and race influence the pattern of wage rates and earnings by occupation. Albeit the study has limitations, the results point to the conclusion that discrimination is a factor in determining rewards by occupation. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
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