ANALYSIS OF RESTAURANT INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN SMOKING- ALLOWED VS. SMOKE-FREE COLLEGE COMMUNITIES.

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    • Abstract:
      This study examined the indoor air quality of restaurants in two cities with universities, one smoke-free (n=15) and one that allowed smoking (n = 17). Results indicated that restaurants protected by smoke-free ordinance had significantly (p=.036) lower levels of paniculate matter (13.10±10.33 µg/m3) compared to restaurants which allowed smoking (130.72±212.64 µg/m3). Mean particulate matter within smoking-allowed restaurants was caused by as few as three cigarettes being smoked at one time. Based on the EPA Air Quality Index, 70.6% of smoking-allowed restaurants yielded an unhealthy classification compared to only 6.7% of smoke-free restaurants (p=.005). Smoke-free ordinances provide effective protection from indoor air pollution. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
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