The Politics of Abjection In P.A.R.G.O.: Los Pecados Permitidos By Waddys Jaquez.

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    • Abstract:
      P.A.R.G.O.: Los Pecados Permitidos (2001) by the Dominican playwright, director, and actor Waddys Jaquez has resonated with diverse audiences across the United States, Latin America, and the Caribbean because it presents a tragicomic vision of the interchange of people, capital, and culture between the north and the south. The author argues that the abject immigrant characters in Jaquez's darkly comic play perform the exclusion of transnational subjectivities from orthodox national imaginaries. In the play, four supposedly rehabilitated Latinos in New York City resist the normalizing action of a support group session—read here as assimilation—and display a politics of abjection that exposes the unremitting "ontological discomfort" of their transnationality. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
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