I see what you see: The lack of a self-serving body-image bias in eating disorders.

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    • Abstract:
      Objectives. Eating-disordered subjects feel unattractive, and the current idea is that this feeling reflects a distorted body image. A distorted body image requires a mismatch between the negative self-judgments and more objective judgments of the body. Design and methods. To examine whether eating-disordered subjects have valid reasons for their feelings of unattractiveness, the body images of eating-symptomatic subjects and control models were compared with inter-subjective evaluations of these bodies given by two community samples (panels; N = 72, N = 88). Results. Although the objective body sizes of the eating-symptomatic subjects were in the normal range and not different from control bodies, the first panel rated the (headless) bodies of the eating-symptomatic subjects as less attractive. This finding was replicated with the second panel. There was also large agreement between the eating-symptomatic subjects and the second panel on the specific body parts that were indicated as unattractive. Contrary to the eating-symptomatic subjects, the control models showed a strong positively biased perception of their own attractiveness: they rated their own bodies more positively than others rated them. Conclusion. Consensual validation of the harsh body appraisals of eating-symptomatic subjects was found. Interestingly, the normal controls were the ones that showed a biased body image; they rated themselves far more attractive than other people rated them. These data suggest that the real problem in eating disorders is not a distorted body image but a lack of a distorted body image, that is, the lack of a self-serving body-image bias. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
      Copyright of British Journal of Clinical Psychology is the property of Wiley-Blackwell and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
    • Author Affiliations:
      1Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Maastricht, The Netherlands
    • ISSN:
      0144-6657
    • Accession Number:
      10.1348/014466505X50167
    • Accession Number:
      20220481
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      JANSEN, A. et al. I see what you see: The lack of a self-serving body-image bias in eating disorders. British Journal of Clinical Psychology, [s. l.], v. 45, n. 1, p. 123–135, 2006. DOI 10.1348/014466505X50167. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=a9h&AN=20220481&custid=s6224580. Acesso em: 4 abr. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Jansen A, Smeets T, Martijn C, Nederkoorn C. I see what you see: The lack of a self-serving body-image bias in eating disorders. British Journal of Clinical Psychology. 2006;45(1):123-135. doi:10.1348/014466505X50167.
    • APA:
      Jansen, A., Smeets, T., Martijn, C., & Nederkoorn, C. (2006). I see what you see: The lack of a self-serving body-image bias in eating disorders. British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 45(1), 123–135. https://doi.org/10.1348/014466505X50167
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Jansen, Anita, Tom Smeets, Carolien Martijn, and Chantal Nederkoorn. 2006. “I See What You See: The Lack of a Self-Serving Body-Image Bias in Eating Disorders.” British Journal of Clinical Psychology 45 (1): 123–35. doi:10.1348/014466505X50167.
    • Harvard:
      Jansen, A. et al. (2006) ‘I see what you see: The lack of a self-serving body-image bias in eating disorders’, British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 45(1), pp. 123–135. doi: 10.1348/014466505X50167.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Jansen, A, Smeets, T, Martijn, C & Nederkoorn, C 2006, ‘I see what you see: The lack of a self-serving body-image bias in eating disorders’, British Journal of Clinical Psychology, vol. 45, no. 1, pp. 123–135, viewed 4 April 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Jansen, Anita, et al. “I See What You See: The Lack of a Self-Serving Body-Image Bias in Eating Disorders.” British Journal of Clinical Psychology, vol. 45, no. 1, Mar. 2006, pp. 123–135. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1348/014466505X50167.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Jansen, Anita, Tom Smeets, Carolien Martijn, and Chantal Nederkoorn. “I See What You See: The Lack of a Self-Serving Body-Image Bias in Eating Disorders.” British Journal of Clinical Psychology 45, no. 1 (March 2006): 123–35. doi:10.1348/014466505X50167.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Jansen A, Smeets T, Martijn C, Nederkoorn C. I see what you see: The lack of a self-serving body-image bias in eating disorders. British Journal of Clinical Psychology [Internet]. 2006 Mar [cited 2020 Apr 4];45(1):123–35. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=a9h&AN=20220481&custid=s6224580