(RE) NAMING AND IDENTITY ISSUE IN JHUMPA LAHIRI'S NOVEL THE NAMESAKE VIS-À-VIS THE REPUBLIC OF MACEDONIA'S NAME CHANGE.

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    • Abstract:
      "Tis but thy name that is my enemy; (...) What's in a name? That which we call a rose by any other word would smell as sweet." In Shakespeare's times, the issues of (re)naming and identity switch seemed as easy as ABC; in Act II, Scene 2 of Romeo and Juliet, these lines, uttered by Juliet are a direct reference to Romeo and his family, the Montague, implying that his name means nothing at all and they should be together regardless of it. Therefore, Romeo is supposed to easily swap names, be some other name, since, "were he not Romeo call'd/Retain that dear perfection which he owes." However, this issue today seems far more complex than just simple, harmless game of changing names for lovers' sake; countries are conditionally forced into being renamed by signing contradictory agreements to secure their future existence; in number of cases in literature, among which is Lahiri's novel The Namesake as well, (re)naming in fact plays crucial role in the process of searching and establishing of the personal identity. The absurdity of retaining one's identity against all odds, and standing tall in modern-day US by being a Bengali Gogol, as well as persevering in the struggle to keep and love one's personal name is as difficult and painful as the process of (re)naming and identity confirmation of a particular country. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
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