Mistress vs Maid: Race, Class, Nation and Boundaries between Women in Argentine Fiction since the Mid‐Nineteenth Century.

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  • Additional Information
    • Subject Terms:
    • Subject Terms:
    • Abstract:
      This article analyses the historical construction of the ‘maid’ and the ‘mistress’ in Argentine literature from the mid-nineteenth century through to today. Inspired by the surprising continuities, as well as the less dramatic changes, in the portrayal of the mistress-maid relationship, it explores literary representations of this ubiquitous but understudied duo. The article reveals how overlapping constructions of gender, race, class, sexuality and national identity have shaped differential understandings of women’s ‘appropriate’ domestic roles. Situating such ideas in relation to contemporary politics and historical legacies of slavery and violence against indigenous and mixed-race peoples highlights the long shadows cast by institutionalised racism. Writers have frequently associated a privileged Argentine identity with the figure of the white mistress and set her in opposition to the figure of the ‘inferior’ non-white maid, suggesting that the white mistresses should maintain racial and class boundaries to preserve order. While this article also examines works that highlight the oppression of the maid, it finds they too have reiterated features of the dominant discourse. We argue that the fraught place of the mistress and the maid in Argentine literature reveals a larger unease with the place of women, especially subaltern women, in Argentina’s national imagination. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
      Copyright of Gender & History is the property of Wiley-Blackwell and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
    • Full Text Word Count:
      13024
    • ISSN:
      0953-5233
    • Accession Number:
      10.1111/1468-0424.12369
    • Accession Number:
      131480871
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      DUNSTAN, I.; PIT, R. Mistress vs Maid: Race, Class, Nation and Boundaries between Women in Argentine Fiction since the Mid‐Nineteenth Century. Gender & History, [s. l.], v. 30, n. 2, p. 401–422, 2018. DOI 10.1111/1468-0424.12369. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=a9h&AN=131480871&custid=s6224580. Acesso em: 27 fev. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Dunstan I, Pit R. Mistress vs Maid: Race, Class, Nation and Boundaries between Women in Argentine Fiction since the Mid‐Nineteenth Century. Gender & History. 2018;30(2):401-422. doi:10.1111/1468-0424.12369.
    • APA:
      Dunstan, I., & Pit, R. (2018). Mistress vs Maid: Race, Class, Nation and Boundaries between Women in Argentine Fiction since the Mid‐Nineteenth Century. Gender & History, 30(2), 401–422. https://doi.org/10.1111/1468-0424.12369
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Dunstan, Inés, and Rebekah Pit. 2018. “Mistress vs Maid: Race, Class, Nation and Boundaries between Women in Argentine Fiction since the Mid‐Nineteenth Century.” Gender & History 30 (2): 401–22. doi:10.1111/1468-0424.12369.
    • Harvard:
      Dunstan, I. and Pit, R. (2018) ‘Mistress vs Maid: Race, Class, Nation and Boundaries between Women in Argentine Fiction since the Mid‐Nineteenth Century’, Gender & History, 30(2), pp. 401–422. doi: 10.1111/1468-0424.12369.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Dunstan, I & Pit, R 2018, ‘Mistress vs Maid: Race, Class, Nation and Boundaries between Women in Argentine Fiction since the Mid‐Nineteenth Century’, Gender & History, vol. 30, no. 2, pp. 401–422, viewed 27 February 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Dunstan, Inés, and Rebekah Pit. “Mistress vs Maid: Race, Class, Nation and Boundaries between Women in Argentine Fiction since the Mid‐Nineteenth Century.” Gender & History, vol. 30, no. 2, July 2018, pp. 401–422. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1111/1468-0424.12369.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Dunstan, Inés, and Rebekah Pit. “Mistress vs Maid: Race, Class, Nation and Boundaries between Women in Argentine Fiction since the Mid‐Nineteenth Century.” Gender & History 30, no. 2 (July 2018): 401–22. doi:10.1111/1468-0424.12369.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Dunstan I, Pit R. Mistress vs Maid: Race, Class, Nation and Boundaries between Women in Argentine Fiction since the Mid‐Nineteenth Century. Gender & History [Internet]. 2018 Jul [cited 2020 Feb 27];30(2):401–22. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=a9h&AN=131480871&custid=s6224580